Fowey Festival 2019

The debate could have gone on for much longer; there are as many versions of Daphne’s relationship with Cornwall as there are people with a story to tell.

When Ali first posted about her plans to run a Daphne du Maurier Reading Week, she mentioned that she shares her birthday with Daphne – 13th May – and also that the Fowey Festival is always timed to include that date.  Started in 1997, the festival was originally named after Daphne.  It is now called the Fowey Festival of Arts and Literature and has broadened in content although du Maurier and her work continue to be a primary focus.  It seems fitting that I end my series of Daphne posts with an account of my festival experience this year, limited though it was. Continue reading “Fowey Festival 2019”

The View from Here: Imagine ….

There is a narrative in the landscape which is universal.  It is a narrative which transcends fact and fiction, past and present, lives real and lives imagined. A narrative which speaks to the soul.

Imagine a small coastal town perched on the edge of an estuary, houses peppering the hills, streets steep and narrow.

polruan 1

This is Polruan … Continue reading “The View from Here: Imagine ….”

The Loving Spirit by Daphne du Maurier

Ali’s Daphne du Maurier reading week is well underway and I’m enjoying reading all the contributions.  I have chosen to read the first of Daphne’s novels, The Loving Spirit, one that I’ve been promising myself for a long time.  And alongside it I’ve read three other books:

Reading Daphne by Ella Westland

Jane Slade of Polruan by Helen Doe

Myself When Young by DDM Continue reading “The Loving Spirit by Daphne du Maurier”

Dewithon Diary iii: rounding off

While any good writing will transcend national borders it is still in literature, and perhaps most of all in the novel, that national identity and character are often best reflected.

It’s about time I rounded off my Dewithon experience, late as usual.  Including the two books still unfinished, I notched up twelve books. Continue reading “Dewithon Diary iii: rounding off”

The Green Hollow by Owen Sheers: How to talk about it

As I researched the details of what happened at Aberfan, I realised this was a historical story with a deeply urgent contemporary resonance: a story of what can happen when a community is run by a corporation.
(Owen Sheers)

On Friday 21st October 1966 a slag heap shifted.  It slid inexorably towards a small mining village in South Wales, destroying several houses and at least one farm.  The worst hit building was Pantglas Junior School.  In total, 144 people were killed.  116 of them were children.  The name of the village was Aberfan.

I remember this disaster; I was a contemporary of the children in that school.  I remember the shock waves and the disbelief and later, the country’s sadness.  I would have been nine years old. Continue reading “The Green Hollow by Owen Sheers: How to talk about it”