WWW Wednesday 25-9-19

IMG_1384-0WWW Wednesday is currently hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words.  Each week there are three questions:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

It’s come around quickly!  Here’s my reading snapshot for this week:

What are you currently reading? On my Kindle I’m currently reading Emma Watson by Joan Aiken.  One of those reads which just happened: I read Sanditon ahead of the tv series, which led to a reading of The Watsons as the two came as a Kindle package.  I was so charmed by this brief fragment and really didn’t want it to stop.  I’m not a fan of contemporary authors attempting to write follow-ups or re-imaginings of the classics but when I happened upon this one by Diana Wynne Jones I couldn’t resist; I had to trust.  And it’s working.  It’s not Austen – what else might we have been offered had she lived longer – but it’s the next best thing.  For the most part I’m enjoying it enormously – despite the occasional jolt and shock happening which I simply can’t believe would ever have come from Jane’s pen.  (I shall be reading more Wynne Jones very soon, far removed from the world of Austen heroines!)

What did you recently finish reading? I have just finished The Fortnight in September by R C Sherriff.  I’ve waited a long time to read this book and my hopes were high.  I was not disappointed.  Published in 1931, the Stevens family take their annual holiday as usual in Bognor.  The simplest of tales, beautifully told, left me yearning for a simpler time and equally aching for what was to come for those who once took such pleasure in their two weeks by the sea.  Lovely read.

What do you think you’ll read next? I have a number of books that I want to read next month for various challenges but I think the next book I shall pick up will be the next in Louise Penny’s series featuring CI Gamache and his team and the beautiful village of Three Pines.  I’ve been reading these in order according to the time of year in which they are set which has worked brilliantly thus far.  (I may have to depart from the plan if it means too long a wait between books.)  The Brutal Telling has been waiting for a while.  It takes place at the end of summer.  Looking outside, I think I’ve missed the window for that!  I need to get on it quickly!

 

49 thoughts on “WWW Wednesday 25-9-19”

  1. I’m embarrassed to admit that I haven’t yet started Louise Penny’s Gamache series. I keep seeing so many recommendations for it. I’ve also read that it’s best to start at the beginning, so I’ll have to check the library for the first book. It sounds as if you’ve been busily reading!

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  2. The Fortnight in September really does sound like a lovely story. And now we have been discussing Louise Penny, I am hoping The Brutal Telling will be your next read. I am also hoping for a review! 😉

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    1. Stargazer, you are much more likely to get a review of Fortnight than The Brutal Telling 😁 Not because one is netter or more worthy than the other but because Fortnight will count towards my classics club challenge. But I’ll try to include it again here when I finish it and it will get a mini review that way!

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      1. Sure, a review of Fortnight would be great as well! One must prioritise one’s reading challenges after all. 😉 I never participate in these challenges – I know in advance I would fail miserably!

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    1. It’s a lovely, gentle book, Laurie. No frills, just well-written prose that washes over the reader and leaves a good feeling. And a family that probably existed all over the country here in the thirties.

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  3. What? Is summer over? Ah, so that means this must be autumn rain rather than summer rain we’re getting! Won’t be long before the winter rain sets in… 😉 Still haven’t read any Louise Penny – one day! And I really must read The Watsons too, though it will just leave me wishing for more…

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    1. So much rain right now! 🌧 I’m happy with it being autumn rain, so far as I’m concerned summer has officially finished – or will have done once I’d dispatched Penny’s end of summer case. I’d be intrigued to hear your thoughts on her series. I’m guessing it would be too warm and cosy for you, and yet…. There’s lots of delicious food in it, and drink. And scenery. Dogs. No cats. And a wonderful policeman who bizzarely reminds me of Maigret despite the fact that the two are quite different.

      The Watsons fragment was just lovely; I much preferred it to Sanditon. Watsons is standard Austen fare; Sanditon is edgy – who knows where it might have gone.

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  4. Simpler times are never going to come back. We are living in times that make for brutal telling. I have been thinking of introducing myself to Inspector Gamache for a while now. Is he worth the trouble?

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    1. I think he’s worth the trouble, Uma. If you decide to get acquainted I do suggest that you begin with the first book. It’s not the best of those that I’ve read but although each case stands alone, there are ongoing threads which make the read richer if read in sequence. Each book tells us a little more about Gamache and his team as policemen and women and as people.

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    1. That suits me nicely, Marina 🙂 Crime novels are better in the winter months I think. I know there will be one more to read this year. After that I’m less clear about the placement of each book in the year and will need to do a little digging about.

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  5. These are the fundamentals, aren’t they?! No matter how woefully intermittent my reading, I can always answer these three questions.
    W1 Now : Ruta Turistica del Pirineo , por José Luis Ollo Luna ; More an exercise in creative writing than a travel guide
    w2 Last : Cloud Sailors, by Hugh Montgomery ; A fable for the present day – a children’s picture book for adults
    w3 Next : The Lighthouse, by Keith McCloskey ; An investigation into the mystery of the Eilean Mor lighthouse keepers

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  6. Louise Penny is so prolific that you’ll have a hard time ever getting caught up, if you continue with your system! I admit to not having loved every book (including the first) but a few of them have blown me away. And I do love Gamache.

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    1. Ha ha, we’ll see, Kerry! I think I’m on book 5 in just over a year so I’m feeling optimistic. And if it’s all gets too slow, I’ll happily read anyway. Gamache is such a great character 🙂

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  7. Sandra, have you been enjoying the Sanditon TV series? I keep meaning to watch it, but I want to squeeze in a read of the unfinished book first. Also I love how you’re reading the Louise Penny books based on the season – I haven’t read any of her books, but I really must at some point. Happy reading! 🙂

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    1. Jessica, like you I wanted to read Sanditon first. Reading that and then The Watsons, which came well before Jane wrote Sanditon, was very interesting. Such a difference in style and reach! I’ve watched two episodes of the tv series so far. The first one did nothing for me at all but I quite liked the second. It’s necessary to suspend all thoughts of Austen, I think. It’s too modern to consider it anywhere close to how Jane might have finished it. But I’m enjoying it all the same.

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    1. Emma Watson is hitting the spot – especially now I have credited it to the correct author! I cheated on the gorgeous cover for Fortnight in September. It is a Persephone cover of course – some of the most popular of their books have been reissued with such covers – but mine is just the usual grey version. Elegant, but doesn’t work so well visually in a blog post!

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        1. Only cheating in that I used it here in the post because it’s prettier. I quite agree that appealing covers play a significant part when it comes to choosing books in general 🙂

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  8. I had a double take here: you meant of course Emma Watson by Joan Aiken. I saw a secondhand copy of this but had no cash at the time, but of course kicked myself when I went back and it had gone. At least I have two other Austen continuations by Aiken…

    Plus I have the Emma fragment by Charlotte Brontë in a collection of unfinished tales, and the Watsons fragment after I’ve finished the Sanditon fragment, which is a great deal funnier than the TV travesty I’m watching through gritted teeth. Our son was originally slated to work on this as part of the camera crew but went for the recent Poliakoff instead, I believe. Good choice, in retrospect.

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    1. Doh! Thank you for alerting me to this, Chris! I have of course got both Aiken and Wynne Jones in the front of my mind at the moment, but really – no excuse! I’m delighted to hear that she wrote more, I’m very much enjoying this one. I too, intend to read the Brontë fragment in due course. As for the tv version of Sanditon, I found that if I viewed it as a modernised, sexed-up interpretation for Sunday evening audiences, then it’s ok. But then, I have only watched two episodes so far! (Post edited.)

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      1. The two I’ve got waiting are the sequel Mansfield Revisited and Jane Fairfax (the latter, as you’ve guessed, related to Emma though I can’t remember if it’s a sequel or prequel.

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  9. I have loved Louise Penny from the first book. I think I started because our late neighbor was from that part of Quebec. I have come to love and think about the characters. A few years ago we visited Montreal and that part of Quebec and it was helpful to understand the setting. I have just started Ann Patchett’s latest “The Dutch House.” Very good so far. Finished “Pachinko” which was very character centered but enlightening about Japanese racism towards Koreans.

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    1. Ann Patchett is an author I’ve had on my radar for a while. Hopefully I shall give her a try eventually. Quebec has always had an attraction for me and I would love to visit. Meanwhile, I get my fix from Penny’s sumptuous descriptions of the area.

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  10. I just love the way your blogs evolve, circulating through ideas and genres….. and countries! I’ve read a couple of Louise Penny and the gentle Gamache, but- at least for the present- my preference is for Peter May. I ‘ve read all of his “Enzo” series ( France) and just embarked upon the “China ” series (no prizes for guessing!)- really well researched and well written crime novels. As usual, best to be read in order . I began reading his novels when I came across The Lewis Trilogy. May is a Scotsman who now lives in France, but has spent some time in China. I agree, Sandra, that crime novels were designed for when the evenings draw in and it’s wet and windy outside!xxx

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    1. Peter May’s Lewis trilogy is on my wish list, Pat. One day. China? Have I missed something? * S worries at both her carelessness in reading emails and her unreliable memory* Pouring down here. Latest Gamache has begun 🙂 xx

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  11. What an interesting selection of reading, Sandra. I keep hearing about Joan Aiken and Diana Wynn Jones, and still haven’t got around to tracking them down. Perhaps I’ll make a Christmas wish-list…

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    1. It’s Chris from Calmgrove who has got me finally reading these authors, Cath, although not necessarily the Austen books – they were a happy accident! I have a number of children’s fantasy classics by both ladies to read over the coming winter months. And it’s always good to have a variety of genres on the go!

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    1. I’m not sure how far I can get in the series reading each one at the appropriate time, Andrea, but so far so good. Penny’s use of the seasons within the stories is so rich. Like you, I much prefer when I can read a book at the right point in the year and especially in the right place 🙂

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